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Bellagio showcases female artists in ‘Painting Women’

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French painter Berthe Morisot studied under Camille Corot and exhibited at the Salon de Paris, then ran with the rebelling Impressionists, some of whom she was closely acquainted with, including her brother-in-law, Édouard Manet. Her predecessor, Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, the official portrait artist for Marie Antoinette, came to be known as the most successful female painter of the 18th century.

Both women belong to a long line of female artists who worked in a vastly male-dominated discipline yet managed to carve out names for themselves with their superior work. They join Mary Stevenson Cassatt, Georgia O’Keeffe and a slew of others in Painting Women: Works From the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Opening February 14 at the Bellagio Gallery of Fine Arts, the exhibit of mostly American artists (only four are French) extracted from a larger MFA Boston exhibit centered on women. It features 34 paintings created between 1860 and 1950, along with two earlier works, Le Brun’s “Portrait of a Young Woman” (about 1797) and Adèle Romany’s “Joseph-Dominque Fabry Garat Playing a Lyre Guitar” (about 1808).

Painting Women: Works From the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston February 15-October 23; daily 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; $11-$16. Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art, 693-7871.

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