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What’s new in: local music

Black Camaro What's Your Favorite Movie? DVD
Four stars

Las Vegas’ longtime weird-pop savants have rounded up their four studio albums, a slew of outtakes, some live recordings, two music videos and a short film for a DVD that feels almost as quirky as its creators sound. Trace BC’s sonic evolution—from its psychedelic origins (2003’s White People F--ked Up the Blues) through a mini-epic that might make Kevin Barnes blush (2005’s Miniature Panthers) to some of the most perfect power-pop to come out of this town (2008’s Pistachio Moustachio)—then warp your brain further with the bizarro movie version of Panthers and its accompanying making-of mini-doc. File under: things you didn’t know you totally need. (

Jacuzzihidive Night Creatures EP
Two and a half stars

If I heard this female-voiced electro-pop coming out of a tent at Coachella, I might poke my head in, but playing through my computer speakers, it’s not standing out in any particular way. There’s lots of synth, big bouncy beats and lyrics that rarely register. Then again, if you’re hoping to turn your dinner gathering into a dance party, there are worse places to start. (

David Hopkins There Are Debts
Four stars

There’s an ace singer-songwriter living among us, and his name is David Hopkins. The Irish native, who played in The Who’s touring band for a stint (yeah, that Who), recently rereleased this 2009 disc, which gives us the opportunity to sing its praises. Everything about it feels totally pro—the arrangements, the production, the guest appearance by Damien Rice on the title track (yeah, that Damien Rice). You want range? Try on this mid-album twofer: the killer-chorused “Angels in the Satellites” into the balmy ballad “God You’re Letting Me Down.” Then clear space on your hard drive for more from David Hopkins. Yeah, that David Hopkins. (

Dinner Music for the Gods Blood and Red Wine
Two and a half stars

Who knew the gods feasted on jazz-metal fusion? The 10 instrumental songs here range from fairly aggressive to the sort of smooth flamenco you might hear at Sunday brunch. They all demonstrate obvious musicianship … and leave me relatively cold in the same way Joe Satriani’s records do. (

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Spencer Patterson

Spencer Patterson is the Editor of Las Vegas Weekly, having previously served as Managing Editor, Arts & Entertainment Editor and ...

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