Site not look beautiful? Click here


Three dudes forget their horrible jobs for one hour a week

Save us, podcast!

There’s a problem on the Quit Your Day Job Radio podcast—UFC fighter Roy “Big Country” Nelson, scheduled to call in, doesn’t. Co-host Danny Jackson is undeterred, coming up with a solution: He’ll call in as Nelson. And he does. Within minutes, his co-hosts, Jered Waller and Josh Smith, are asking “Roy” all the questions they had prepared. The moment is completely unscripted, completely ludicrous—and pretty damned funny.


Beyond the Weekly
Check out the podcast at

And that, in a nutshell, is the heart of Quit Your Day Job Radio, taped weekly in the breakfast nook of Waller’s Green Valley home. “We would all just crack each other up every time we got together, so we figured, why not do a podcast?” says Jackson, a stand-up comedian who had been in two local improvisational troupes, Barely Worth It and The Lost Episodes, before starting Quit with his compatriots in January.

The source of the show’s name should be obvious: These guys all hate their current occupations and hope their podcast is successful enough to allow them to, well, you know. They’ve spent quite a chunk of change on equipment and advertising, including a spot on Kevin Smith’s Smodcast, and already have 26 episodes on their website. (Today’s taping is No. 27.)

Success has been slow—they picked up one fan, “Tankus Maximus,” from the Kevin Smith advertising, and he calls them “pickle washers”—but it’s a small price to pay for getting together once a week to forget about their troubles and have some fun at, say, Roy Nelson’s expense.

Photo of Ken Miller

Ken Miller is Las Vegas Magazine's managing editor, having previously served as associate editor at Las Vegas Weekly, assistant features ...

Get more Ken Miller

Commenting Policy

Previous Discussion:

  • Scarborough bears an uncanny resemblance to Swift, and we’re not just talking about long legs and red lipstick.

  • Nevada is no stranger to NASA research, and Desert Research Institute scientists have spent years studying life in extreme environments.

  • Get More As We See It Stories
Top of Story