Taste

Tasting the hype at Gordon Ramsay Steak

Image
Behold the signature Beef Wellington at Gordon Ramsay Steak.
Photo: Beverly Poppe

The opening of Gordon Ramsay Steak is super-huge, probably the biggest celebrity chef restaurant to hit the Strip in several years. Ramsay’s larger-than-life landing in Las Vegas instantly creates the second biggest draw at Paris (behind the faux Eiffel Tower, of course). But it’s a curious arrival at a critical juncture: Vegas’ food reputation is rising, aspiring to something more than big names and expensive meals. Ramsay is famous to most of us for being a forceful, even angry, TV personality. We know his character—or caricature—more than we know his food. This creates unique expectations for his Vegas steakhouse, probably the most accessible of his U.S. restaurants.

I haven’t seen much of Ramsay’s TV stuff. After eating his food, I became curious, and caught up on the current season of MasterChef, where he critiques the kitchen work of home cooks. It’s an entertaining show. I liked the part where he slams someone’s steak tartare for being bland, because that’s the way I would describe the dish at his restaurant. It’s also the only thing I tasted there that falls short of excellence.

The Details

Gordon Ramsay Steak
Paris, 946-7000.
Daily, 5-10:30 p.m.

The steaks, which come from New York butcher Pat LaFrieda (just like those at Caesars’ recently opened Old Homestead), are terrific, particularly the juicy ribeye ($56) and the American Kobe rib cap ($58). The starter plates are even better, from chorizo-stuffed, butter-poached Maine lobster ($28) to a delightful, cleanly flavored roasted beet salad ($18) with creamy ricotta and oyster mushrooms. Signature dishes are also fun and flavorful. Beef Wellington ($52) is cooked perfectly, with both meat and pastry clocking in at luxurious. The loup de mer (sea bass) fish and chips are great if overpriced at $44. Remember, this is a big-time Strip steakhouse, so be ready to spend.

The best parts are the desserts and the space. The sticky toffee pudding, a dense, moist cake-ish creation done in all kinds of rich with brown butter ice cream nearby, wants to be the top treat in town. It’s a power dessert in a power room, a two-story hideout done in dramatic reds and dark woods, with a mighty Union Jack on the ceiling and a slick bar encased in the Chunnel-like tube. The things you have to do to live up to hype, huh?

Share
Photo of Brock Radke

Brock Radke is Las Vegas Weekly's managing editor and has been writing about Las Vegas for more than 15 years.

Get more Brock Radke

Commenting Policy

Previous Discussion:

  • The casino has old-school appeal, as does its new steakhouse.

  • She's got a legendary chef's madeleines down to perfection.

  • “It’s not gonna be this foo-foo stuff … It’s gonna be cheap booze, cheap slices and just really good food.”

  • Get More Dining Stories
Top of Story