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System of a Down, Las Vegas Pride, Sin City Horror Fest and other stuff to do this week

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Ruckus invades Marquee on October 22.
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  • FIVB Las Vegas Open at Las Vegas Festival Grounds

    Three-time Olympic gold medalist Kerri Walsh brings high-level men’s and women’s beach volleyball—plus a health and wellness village with yoga sessions, cooking demos and more—to the Strip, for free, no less. October 18-21, Times vary, register at bit.ly/2PpV71I. –Spencer Patterson

  • System of a Down at T-Mobile Arena

    Nu-metal group System of a Down has spent the past 20 years infusing its heavy discography with political themes that extend far beyond radio hits like “Chop Suey!” Combine its progressive leanings with the abrasiveness of turn-of-the-millennium contemporaries At the Drive-In and you’ve got potential for a turbulent, nostalgia-fueled rock show for the ages. With Skeletonwitch. October 19, 7 p.m., $70-$100. –Leslie Ventura

  • Death Valley Girls at Bunkhouse Saloon

    Southern California’s recent, loaded Desert Daze festival didn’t send a psych-rock windfall to Las Vegas, but this rising LA quintet will represent when it brings gloom-meets-glam new LP Darkness Rains Downtown. With DRÆMINGS, The Acid Sisters. October 19, 9 p.m., $12-$15. –Spencer Patterson

  • Las Vegas Pride at Various Locations

    Most cities swelter under the sun during their summer Pride celebrations. Ours doesn’t. On Friday, the Valley’s LGBT community (and its allies) will march down Fourth Street under the stars during the Pride parade. On Saturday and Sunday, they’ll take over Sunset Park for the Festival, enjoying entertainers, food and beverages—and moderate, mid-80s temps. October 19-21, For info, visit lasvegaspride.org. –Mike Prevatt

  • Sin City Horror Fest at Brenden Theaters

    For its second year, the Sin City Horror Fest moves from Downtown to the Brenden Theatres at the Palms, but the approach remains the same: showcasing independent horror features and short films over the course of three days. This year, the festival will also host a screening of John Carpenter’s 1978 horror classic Halloween, just in time for the new franchise reboot to hit theaters. Seeing such an intense, primal horror movie on the big screen is absolutely the best way to experience it.

    Other feature selections include cult-movie documentary Survival of the Film Freaks, Chinese zombie film Lost in Apocalypse, 1980s-homage anthology Skeletons in the Closet and the delightfully titled Canadian horror-comedy Camp Death III in 2D! There are also dozens of short films spread across five blocks, including Nite Nite, starring local actress (and burgeoning indie scream queen) Tommie Vegas. The festival organizers have put together another wide-ranging program that showcases the talent and innovation of low-budget horror filmmaking. October 19-21, $10 per screening, $25 passes. –Josh Bell

  • Falsettos at Las Vegas Little Theatre

    Take a man, his ex-wife, his son, his lesbian neighbors, his lover (named Whizzer Brown, because why not?) and add an assortment of Tony-winning songs (including “Four Jews in a Room Bitching”) and presto. October 19-November 4, Show times vary, $22-$25. –Geoff Carter

  • Jazz Ensemble I at UNLV's Artemus Ham Hall

    The greatness of UNLV’s primary jazz troupe will be augmented by Sunday’s guest: dynamic jazz/rock drummer Gregg Bissonette. Together, they’ll honor Leonard Bernstein and Buddy Rich—with whom Bissonette once played. October 21, 3 p.m., $8-$10. –Mike Prevatt

  • Ruckus at Marquee

    He’s the DJ to the stars, a high-fashion event fixture, cousin to Lenny Kravitz and husband to supermodel Shanina Shaik—and he’s also a resident at Marquee. Ruckus returns to rock the Monday-night industry party at the Cosmo club this week. October 22, 10:30 p.m., $20-$30. –Brock Radke

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