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The Weekly Playlist: Deep cuts from the Psychedelic Furs and the Church

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Annie Zaleski

The Church

“Tristesse”

The second song on 1985’s Heyday is a spiritual cousin of California’s Paisley Underground movement: Psychedelic jangle and twinkling piano, as well as sighing harmonies, lend the song a bittersweet sheen.

“North, South, East and West”

In addition to the band’s best song (that would be “Under The Milky Way”), 1988’s Starfish contains this gem, featuring moody guitar ripples and lyrics relevant to today’s political climate.

“Appalatia”

This disorienting, shoegaze-psych song from 2003’s Forget Yourself features a breathy lead vocal turn from guitarist Peter Koppes and soaring, spacious arrangements.

Psychedelic Furs

“We Love You”

The Furs solidified their reputation as the punk Velvet Underground on their first single, courtesy of sauntering guitar drone, lively sax, strutting bass lines and Richard Butler’s foggy sneer.

“All Of This And Nothing”

The final song on 1981’s Talk Talk Talk is an agonized six-minute dirge about the emotional and physical wreckage of a broken relationship—something conveyed by mournful sax and pitch-black guitar thunderclouds.

“Should God Forget”

The Furs ended the ’80s by ditching their glossy keyboards in favor of a dreamier, shoegaze-roiled sound—as heard on 1989’s “Should God Forget,” which combines swirling, psychedelic-kissed guitars and rawer vocals.

THE PSYCHEDELIC FURS & THE CHURCH July 16, 7 p.m. Brooklyn Bowl, $30-$35.

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