As We See It

Trunk Show: Wood grain offers a warm and striking look

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Forget high-tech. Fashion and design are going back to basics. From sunglasses to neckties, wood grain is showing up in unexpected places for a look that’s warm and striking. When the raw materials are so right, beauty comes naturally.

1. Oak Moment, Flud, $85, fludwatches.com Flud’s Oak Big Ben watch was the company’s best-selling timepiece for the holidays. From the Spring ’11 collection, this watch follows in its footsteps with a graceful update that’s polished and sophisticated.

2. Shellcase for iPhone 4, Vers, $40, versaudio.com Available in bamboo, cherry or walnut, Vers’ iPhone cases are warm and natural with a scratch-resistant lining to protect your tech. If you want to protect the environment too, Vers is a great choice: The company ships in 100 percent recycled containers and plants 100 hardwood trees for every one that it uses in production through a partnership with the Arbor Day Foundation.

3. Woodgrain tie, Cyberoptix Tie Lab, $30 microfiber, $40 silk, cyberoptix.com Founded by a sculptor and costume designer, Cyberoptix makes witty, fashion-forward ties too cool for the boardroom. Their woodgrain design is available in four colors.

4. Govy Zebrawood, Shwood, $98, shwoodshop.com Shwood melds classic eyewear fashion with natural materials for stylish pieces handmade in their Portland woodshop. These Govy glasses are crafted from sustainably harvested African wood, and like the trees they come from, each pair is unique.

5. A-Frame snowboard, Arbor Collective, $595, arborcollective.com Made with a core of paulownia and poplar wood with bamboo sidewalls and an inlaid wood top sheet, Arbor’s A-Frame board is built for big mountain performance. While the board isn’t totally “green,” the company’s goal is to replace as many harmful materials as possible with ecologically sound alternatives—without sacrificing style, of course.

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