As We See It

The fear is near: Haunted-house season begins this weekend

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A costumed character roams the grounds scaring visitors and spitting fire at the Freakling Bros.’ Trilogy of Terror haunted house in October 2013.
L.E. Baskow

Halloween season is upon us, and October 2 marks the opening of two haunts. The first, and biggest of them all, is Fright Dome, Jason Egan’s big-budget, spooked-out transformation of Circus Circus’ Adventuredome. The un-lucky 13th edition features, naturally, a Friday the 13th experience for the 4D Special FX Theatre and all new mazes, including the fast pass-only Insanitarium requiring brave patrons to find their own way out (and including acquisitions from an actual insane asylum). October 2-31, doors at 7 p.m., $36-$100, frightdome.com.

Fans of more lo-fi but actor-driven (and cheaper) neighborhood haunted houses needn’t travel any farther than the northwestern parking lot at the Meadows Mall to brave Las Vegas Haunts’ long-running Asylum and Hotel Fear walk-throughs. October 2-31, doors at 6:30 p.m., $15-$35, lasvegashaunts.com.

Those experiences should hold spook-seekers over until other attractions open up next weekend. On October 8, Bonnie Springs Ranch turns into the expansive, immersive Bonnie Screams ($25), and the next day the Freakling Bros’ Trilogy of Terror ($14-$35)—including the new Coven of 13 maze—re-emerges at the Grand Canyon Shopping Center. For the younger set, HallOVeen ($10-$22) at Opportunity Village’s Magical Forest starts back up on October 9, and Springs Preserve’s popular Haunted Harvest ($7) begins October 16.

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