A&E

Holi Festival of Colors, Viva Las Vegas and more stuff you need to know about

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The Sunset Park version of Holi, the springtime Indian “festival of love,” is set for April 15.
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    • ‘An American in Paris’ at the Smith Center

      American composer George Gershwin translated the kinetic feeling of Jazz-age Paris into music with a 1928 orchestral piece titled An American in Paris. His success spawned a grand artistic tradition that takes us to the latest installment of the Smith Center’s Broadway Las Vegas series.

      Just like the classic 1951 film starring Gene Kelly, the Tony award-winning stage version features dance, romance and classic Gershwin brothers’ songs “The Man I Love,” “They Can’t Take That Away from Me” and “I Got Rhythm.” Who could ask for anything more? April 12-16, Times vary, $29-$127, 702-749-2000. –C. Moon Reed

    • Doom metal at Beauty Bar

      What’s better than catching one sinister, Sabbath-worshipping, female-fronted doom act under a full moon (or damn near it) Downtown? Catching three: Portland’s Disenchanter, Houston’s Doomstress and reliably skull-crushing Vegas favorite Demon Lung. Best of all: You get all three for free. April 13, 8 p.m.–Spencer Patterson

    • Viva Las Vegas at The Orleans

      Just how popular is the annual weekender? Its dates are set all the way to 2025. And if that’s not an indication of how far one needs to plan ahead to attend what’s considered the largest rockabilly and pre-1960s car gatherings in the world, this year’s primary festival passes are already sold out. To those who aren’t resourceful with scoring tickets: See ya later, alligator. But to those who are, your options overfloweth. There’s over 75 love music acts, including legends Wanda Jackson, Brenda Lee and Freddy Cannon, and more contemporary groups like the Reverend Horton Heat and Los Straitjackets. There are tiki pool parties and swimsuit competitions. There’s a pinup contest, fashion show and tattoo lounge. And there’s burlesque bingo. But if you’ve been shut out of all of that: Tickets remain for the car show, a must for anyone wanting to make the scene. April 13-16, $35-$50 for car show, vivalasvegas.net. –Mike Prevatt

    • ‘Mayor of the Sunset Strip’ at Double Down Saloon

      You may not know who Rodney Bingenheimer is, but you’ve likely felt his influence. In his heyday, the LA-based tastemaker and DJ helped to break dozens of punk and new wave bands, and there’s no one better to host a screening of the 2003 George Hickenlooper documentary of his life than X singer Exene Cervenka, who’s one of the first people to appear in the film. She’ll tell stories about Bingenheimer, about the peerless music scene they were both a part of … and, presumably, about her own amazing career. April 13, 9 p.m., 21 and over, free, doubledownsaloon.com. –Geoff Carter

    • Holi Festival of Colors at Sunset Park

      If you’ve ever been to a color run, you may have wondered where the idea of throwing powdered dye on people originated. The answer is the Indian spring celebration Holi, also known as the festival of love. Observed throughout India on the last full moon of the Hindi lunar calendar, the fest not only marks the changing of the seasons, it symbolizes letting go of the past and forgiving others. And there’s no running involved. It’s a celebration of humanity, not to mention one of the most ‘grammable events of the year. April 15, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., 2601 E. Sunset Road, $6, festivalofcolorsusa.com. –Leslie Ventura

    • Thug Kitchen Pop-Up at VegeNation

      The profane renegade vegan cooking crew and cookbook collective Thug Kitchen lands Downtown at our own vegan stronghold, chef Donald Lemperle’s VegeNation, for a two-day extravaganza of creative cookery, recipe gathering and general avoidance of processed anything. April 15 and 16, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., 616 E. Carson Ave. –Brock Radke

    • Spring Wine Walk at Red Rock Resort

      Expecting another poolside stroll and sip? Wrong! The Spring Wine Walk is a laidback journey among the Red Rock’s restaurant patios—Yardhouse, Hearthstone, Libre, Salute, T-Bones, Onyx Bar (which is nice but not really a patio) plus the Sandbar Pool. If you’re like us, you’ll probably get stuck at the cozy T-Bones patio with a warm red, but the program will feature everything from rosé to bubbles from various wineries. April 15, 5-8 p.m., $50-$60, sclv.com/entertainment. –Brock Radke

    • Las Vegas Baroque Festival at UNLV

      “Baroque” music may seem impossibly fancy today, but the term began as an insult. Derived from a Portuguese word for “irregularly shaped pearl,” it was like the 17th century version of kitsch. It denoted an overly ornate style. Think Liberace’s bathtub, and you get why Baroque is actually a great fit for Las Vegas.

      Created by flutist and UNLV music professor Jennifer Grim, the six-day Las Vegas Baroque Festival will celebrate this dynamic, emotional and complex period of music that lasted from 1600-1750. Events feature faculty, students and guests performing a variety of Baroque music, including chorale masterworks and chamber concerts.

      The festivities begin with a 7:30 p.m. April 18 lecture by UNLV musicologist Jonathan Rhodes Lee titled “What is ‘Baroque’ about Baroque?” The talk includes a harpsichord demonstration. Additional highlights include the Archetti Baroque String Orchestra (7:30 p.m. April 21) and award-winning organist Craig Cramer (4 p.m. April 23). Attendees can join in the fun with a Baroque Play-Along and Dance Party (1 p.m. and 2 p.m. April 23). April 18-23, Lasvegasbaroquefestival.com. –C. Moon Reed

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