Electric Daisy Carnival

EDC’s local economic impact crosses billion dollar mark

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The 2015 Electric Daisy Carnival from June 19-21, 2015, at Las Vegas Motor Speedway.
Photo: Tom Donoghue / DonoghuePhotography.com

Joke all you want about the candy kids in ridiculous raver gear that overtake the Vegas Valley during EDC week, but do not deny their capacity to empty their wallets for our city and state.

With Electric Daisy Carnival 2015 generating an estimated $350.3 million last June, the festival—which, at 405,000 over three days (or 135,000 passholders), garners the largest attendance count for a one-weekend music-event in North America—has now purportedly directed $1.3 billion into Las Vegas during its five years here. That $350 million—an increase of about $12 million from the 2014 edition—includes $168.3 million in attendee direct spending and $141.3 in increased labor income for the Clark County workforce.

The economic impact study comes courtesy of Beacon Economics, LLC, which is commissioned by EDC producer Insomniac.

It also says that the past five years have drawn more than 1.7 million attendees to the Las Vegas Motor Speedway, who have spent $1 billion in the area. That includes $145.4 million toward accommodations, $188.9 million toward food and beverage, $93.6 toward transportation—even $87.9 in gaming revenue. The state and local tax haul from EDC has also grown to $81.4 million, thanks to the $21.9 million generated last year. That figure is sure to rise after this year’s edition with the state’s new live entertainment tax having been in effect since October, though some ticketbuyers dodged the 9 percent fee during a September presale.

Three-day general admission passes for this year’s edition, to be held June 17-19, are still available here for $430 (including a $32 live entertainment tax and a $43 service fee), with VIP and shuttle passes options also on offer. The festival, which began in LA in 1997, celebrates its 20th anniversary this year.

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Mike Prevatt

Mike started his journalism career at UCLA reviewing CDs and interviewing bands, less because he needed even more homework and ...

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