As We See It

Walleska EcoChicc stresses sustainability in all its products

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Walleska EcoChicc: Eco-friendly and oh-so styish

Done drinking that Pepsi? Was that the last drop of your PBR? Because Walleska Tepping wants your pop tab.

Yes, your pop tab. The Brazilian native is the founder of Walleska EcoChicc, a line of clothing and accessories made from recycled and sustainable materials. Aside from the belts and handbags made from soda pop tabs stitched together to look like chainmail, the line includes garments and jewelry made from native Brazilian plants and seeds and repurposed fish skins. Somehow these things manage to look good.

“There’s so much going on in the world regarding sustainability. I think it takes a little bit of effort from all of us,” says Tepping. And the effort in crafting EcoChicc’s repurposed items is not Tepping’s alone. The line is co-created by Tepping and nearly 40 female artists in the satellite cities surrounding Brazil’s capital of Brasilia. The company practices fair trade principles, and the women Tepping cooperates with work independently from home, allowing them to tend to their families and homes while earning revenue for the household.

Details

Oya Eco Couture
The District at Green Valley Ranch, 228-3261

Tepping created the line with a vision to improve the socioeconomic status of her community. She even named the business venture to reflect its mission: EcoChicc stands for Ecologically Conscious Organization Celebrating, Honoring, Inspiring Creative Communities. “I found a purpose that really helps me feel like I’m doing something,” the designer explains, adding, “I love bringing people together.”

Environmentally-savvy fashionistas can find Walleska EcoChicc at The District’s Oya Eco Couture, a boutique filled with clothing and accessories made from recycled products or sustainable materials. “When people come in they are surprised,” says Oya owner Cheryl Samlaska. “They can be fashionable and help sustain our planet.”

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