As We See It

Nightclub abs? The Cosmopolitan gets into alt-fitness

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Dance does a body good: Clubbing is a workout, officially.
Photo: Spencer Burton

At the front of the room, 305 Fitness founder Sadie Kurzban transforms from soft-spoken instructor to tough-as-nails drill sergeant, her voice echoing off mirrored walls. “Hep!” she yells, signaling the students to turn—now. We shake it off with a “Macarena”-ish move (hands to head, shoulders, then hips), followed by a quick sprint. I’m waving my hands in the air, and even though I look silly as hell, my dance-class-virgin nerves fade away.

Cosmopolitan partnered with FITiST Collective, a campaign to spread boutique fitness trends, to bring classes like 305 Fitness' nightclub-inspired workout to the hotel.

Cosmopolitan partnered with FITiST Collective, a campaign to spread boutique fitness trends, to bring classes like 305 Fitness' nightclub-inspired workout to the hotel.

Hailing from Miami, Kurzban came up with the idea for 305 Fitness after realizing a night at the club could double as an intense calorie burner. Named after her old area code, 305 Fitness combines the nightclub environment (black lights, a live DJ, lots of neon) with funky choreography and high-intensity interval training that can burn up to 800 calories per session. And while you’d normally have to be in New York City to check out Kurzban’s classes, last week tourists and locals got to experience her concept inside the Cosmopolitan’s pop-up space (normally a boxing gym).

It’s part of the resort’s partnership with FITiST Collective, a campaign to spread boutique fitness trends. With global interest in healthy living on the rise, Cosmopolitan chief marketing officer Lisa Marchese says FITiST is driving discovery. “People are just thinking about their lifestyle differently. That interest is really around these boutique fitness concepts that allow you to try a new workout, that give you a new challenge outside of just going to the gym.”

The 305 pop-up is over, but the Cosmo’s fitness programming extends through February, including classes designed by workout guru Tracy Anderson and NYC-based Yoga for Bad People. Even better, the classes are affordable ($15-$30), making FITiST a great way to try something new—and the perfect excuse to hit up brunch after.

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Leslie Ventura is a staff writer at Las Vegas Weekly and Industry Weekly. She’s picked the brains of rock stars ...

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