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Josh Bell

Josh Bell is the film editor for Las Vegas Weekly, where he's been writing movie and TV reviews since 2002. He's also written about movies for The Dissolve, LA Weekly, Film Racket and other outlets. Find more from him at joshbellhateseverything.com.

Recent Stories (view all stories)

  • Screen

    Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017

    Held in a bunker, James has been socialized entirely by watching episodes of a surreal kid-oriented sci-fi show.

  • A&E

    Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017

    Rolling Stone recently named her one of “10 new country artists you need to know.”

  • Screen

    Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017

    While the case mostly proceeds along a straight line, writer/director Taylor Sheridan fills out the story with rich details of life on the reservation.

  • Screen

    Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017

    The heist comedy, which recalls the Ocean’s trilogy, is the inversion of the slick, high-end robberies of those star-studded studio features.

  • Screen

    Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017

    The subject is the step-dance team at the Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women, an inner-city charter school dedicated to sending every one of its students to college.

  • A&E

    Monday, Aug. 14, 2017

    She remains a fantastic live act, distilling the best of her music, her fashion sense, her vocal skills and her charismatic personality into a two-hour stage spectacle.

  • Screen

    Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017

    The bomb ended up killing eight bystanders but no high-ranking Nazi officials, as Hitler had left the building 13 minutes earlier.

  • Screen

    Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017

    The show has almost nothing in common with its source material, either Barry Sonnenfeld’s 1995 movie or the 1990 Elmore Leonard novel on which it was based.

  • Screen

    Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017

    Much of the movie is just marking time until evil forces show up to wreak havoc.

  • Screen

    Friday, Aug. 4, 2017

    Although Jake is a major character in King’s books, his more prominent role here makes the movie come off like an opportunistic C-level YA adaptation rather than the realization of Stephen King's unique vision.