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Arsenio Hall, a Tennessee Williams trio, caviar tastings and other stuff to do this week

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The Dog Pound assembles Saturday at the Orleans.
Illustration: Photo by Amy Harris / AP Photo
  • Reverend Horton Heat at Backstage Bar & Billiards

    It’s a straight-up triple threat, rocketing out of the ’90s: The psychobilly madness of Reverend Horton Heat, the ska-punk bellicosity of The Voodoo Glow Skulls and the Slavic folk-surf-rockabilly fusion of The Red Elvises, all on one glorious, deafening bill. Brace for impact. February 1, 8 p.m., $20-$23. –Geoff Carter

  • Three by Tenn at Majestic Repertory Theatre

    Tennessee Williams’ writerly gifts weren’t solely confined to that Streetcar or Hot Tin Roof. UNLV’s African American Student Association of Theatre and Film and Majestic Repertory Theatre are staging three of Williams’ “lesser-known” short plays, including “Why Do You Smoke So Much, Lily?” February 2-4, $15. –Geoff Carter

  • Interfaith art at Haven Craft

    Since moving into the Arts Factory late last year, Haven Craft—a nonprofit spiritual community center, curio shop and apothecary—has added one more descriptor: art gallery. For the month of February it will display paintings by Gustave Alhadeff. A “master artist” from the Belgium Royal Art Academy, Alhadeff teaches art in St. George, Utah. His colorful expressionist paintings focus on interfaith themes, and will join pieces from local artists, along with sculptures by Danielle Rose Lyman. “She’s one of my favorite artists,” Haven Craft’s Melissa Eggstaff says of the beadwork-covered bone sculptures. “The intricate art is made in the style of South American sacred pieces. It’s stylish and a little aggressive, while still being elegant and showing off more patience and skill than I will ever have.” February 2-28, 5 p.m., free. –C. Moon Reed

  • Arsenio Hall at Orleans Showroom

    Since it only lasted for one season, you might have missed the reboot of The Arsenio Hall Show three years ago. Yeah, it didn’t work out. “When I left late night it was me and Johnny [Carson] and Dave [Letterman], and when I came back there were nine white guys named Jimmy,” cracks Hall. “But it’s all timing. Maybe because I’m a comic I blame everything on timing, but that’s the word.”

    It was timing that made the comedian/actor a pop-culture touchstone during his talk show’s 1989-1994 run, when so many movie stars, athletes and musicians made a stop on his sofa. Hall’s show also pushed hip-hop into the mainstream like never before. “I got the chance to put on a genre that went on to take over the world,” he says. “Now I see rappers in Germany and pants sagging in Japan—it’s the whole culture. And you can’t do music [on late-night TV] the way you used to. Everybody wants to play games now, because it’s cheaper. You would rather get Will Smith to ride out on a horse and play Pictionary than have to deal with rehearsals and clearances. I think SNL is the only vehicle still committed to breaking artists and doing music the way we used to.”

    Hall’s recent return to stand-up comedy brings him to the Orleans this weekend, and he’s hoping to make fun in Vegas a regular thing. “The last time I was there, I think I was opening for Gladys Knight at the Hilton. It’s different when they’re coming to see you.” February 3, 8 p.m., $30-$50. –Brock Radke

  • Caviar tastings at Artisanal Foods

    If you’re a fan of briny delicacies, you know fish eggs can be heavy on the wallet. Sample Beluga, Kaluga, Oscietra, white fish, trout and salmon roe without the high price tag, while learning about their history and production. February 3, 2 & 4 p.m., $35, 2053 Pama Lane. –Leslie Ventura

  • TSMRKT Debate Night at Huntridge Tavern

    Calling all former forensics nerds (sorry CSI fans, we mean the debate team). Grab a friend and prepare your public forum-style case on possible topics like gun control, reparations, bike lanes, net neutrality and Star Wars. The winning team of two receives a $50 bar tab. May the best lush win. February 6, 8 p.m., Free. –Leslie Ventura

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