Screen

DC’s Legends of Tomorrow’ gets carried away with its comic-book homage

Image
DC’s Legends of Tomorrow

Two and a half stars

DC's Legends of Tomorrow Thursdays, 8 p.m., the CW.

The superhero universe featured in the CW’s Arrow and The Flash has gotten quite crowded, and the new series DC’s Legends of Tomorrow is a sort of overflow bin for DC Comics characters who’ve been taking up screen time on those other two shows. Producers Greg Berlanti and Andrew Kreisberg (who also oversee DC superhero show Supergirl on CBS) have cherry-picked a team of heroes and villains from both of their other CW series, setting them up with a time-traveling mission that allows them to encounter plenty of other DC favorites. For comic book fans who’ve been eager to see superhero shows more closely mimic their source material, Legends might be geek-out heaven, since it resembles an old-school superhero crossover series.

For anyone who hasn’t been diligently following Arrow and The Flash, though, Legends is fairly impenetrable, a complicated sci-fi adventure with a team of superpowered characters chasing after a series of meaningless doodads, all in service of defeating a villain (the immortal Vandal Savage) who clearly can’t actually be defeated at least until the season finale. The crew of heroes (including the Atom, Firestorm, Hawkgirl, White Canary, Captain Cold and Heat Wave) all vie for their own pieces of the plot, leading to a show that feels cluttered even without jumping around in time. The superhero cheesiness that is often endearing on The Flash and Supergirl goes into overdrive here, and while some of the action is impressive, it’s in service of such silly, borderline nonsensical storytelling that even hardcore geeks might find it a bit much.

Share
  • From Avengers: Endgame to Toy Story 4 to Tarantino and beyond.

  • The event’s 12th edition runs April 28 through May 4 at the Palms and Downtown’s Inspire Theater.

  • This year’s event features another packed lineup of short films, with more than 120 selections spread over 20-plus thematic programs and four days.

  • Get More Film Stories
Top of Story