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A dozen reasons why Ronald’s rules

Las Vegas loves this small Spring Mountain Road doughnut shop and it’s easy to see why.
Photo: Nick Coletsos

1. The apple fritter is not really a doughnut, yet it elevates the world of doughnutdom. Discuss.

2. You know it’s a great apple fritter when it has those crispy, knobby parts.

3. Speaking of crispy, knobby parts, old-fashioned doughnuts. With chocolate.

4. You don’t have to choose between coconut and sprinkles; you can have both.

5. Almost all the non-cake doughnuts at Ronald’s are vegan, which is ridiculous.

6. Old men drink coffee and read papers here in the morning, a mark of a true, non-trendy doughnut shop.

7. A dozen costs $7.50. That’s absurd. Might as well get four … dozen.

8. Ronald’s bear claw: as big as an actual bear’s claw, but much tastier.

9. The only thing fancy about Ronald’s is the melt-in-your-mouth French cruller, a classic.

10. Most days, Ronald’s opens at 4 a.m., which means when you’re done at the club and considering calling it a night, you might want to reconsider.

11. “What flavor is the orange one?” “It’s orange.”

12. There’s no such thing as a turnover shop, a place that sells different turnovers with one or two doughnuts. But there are cherry turnovers at Ronald’s. And thank God.

Ronald’s Donuts 4600 Spring Mountain Road, 873-1032. Monday-Friday, 4 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturday, 5 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunday, 5 a.m.-2 p.m.

Tags: Dining
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Brock Radke is Las Vegas Weekly's associate editor and manages the magazine's dining and nightlife sections and writes the Strip-centric ...

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