As We See It

Amazon Prime Now wants to bring you soup in a serious hurry

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Amazon Prime Now rolled out in Las Vegas last week.

For all the times you’ve wondered where you’re going to locate an umbrella right before your Portland trip or a Cards Against Humanity box ahead of that night’s dinner party, we finally have Amazon Prime Now, which delivers a minimum of $20 worth of goods to Amazon Prime subscribers’ doors within an hour or two (your choice; see below). But the new service, which rolled out in Las Vegas last week, comes with notable caveats—its unavailability of Cards Against Humanity being a key one.

Before you can search for which chicken soups you can have delivered to your disease-riddled apartment—spoiler: at least 20—you must first download the Amazon Prime Now app onto your phone (and not your iPad, because that, mystifyingly, isn’t available yet).

The service is only available between 10 a.m. and midnight, so there will be no immediate-gratification drunk-shopping once you get home from karaoke at Dino’s.

When you opt for free two-hour delivery—as opposed to the $7.99 one-hour option—you’re not getting your Breathe Right Nasal Strips within two hours of ordering. Instead, you must choose an available two-hour delivery block, which could push back the arrival further back than expected.

Your courier cannot receive a cash tip. Gratuity is an (elective) add-on during your order, and the minimum is $5, regardless of your order’s total.

There’s no dining delivery in Sin City yet, but fret not: You can still order Talenti Gelato right to your doorstep—but only the Caramel Cookie Crunch variety. Sea Salt Caramel remains, like way too many other necessities, a two-mile Target trip away.

Tags: News, Business
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Mike Prevatt

Mike started his journalism career at UCLA reviewing CDs and interviewing bands, less because he needed even more homework and ...

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