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The Year of the Rooster, Willie Nelson and more stuff you need to know about

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The Chinese New Year display stays up through March 4 at Bellagio Conservatory.
Photo: Steve Marcus
    • HIR AT ART SQUARE THEATRE

      Realism, as a genre, isn’t dead. It’s just that the confines of realism no longer seem expansive enough to encompass, well, reality. Especially if you continue to define realism by the tenets of the mid-20th century: white, middle-class, hetero-normative. The world no longer looks like that (if it ever actually did). But what happens when you try to shoehorn the world we now live in into that genre? You end up with a play like Taylor Mac’s HIR, a bizarro-kitchen sink drama produced by Cockroach Theatre. “It’s a deconstruction of the classical 20th century, linear, middle-class family drama,” director Chris Brown says. He pulled the script off the shelf on a trip to a bookstore and started browsing through it. “I ended up sitting there reading the whole thing. I fell in love with it. What was so appealing to me about the show was that this was a playwright who was taking that entire form that has excluded a lot of the alternative-lifestyle members, taking that entire establishment of ‘legitimate,’ value-confirming middle class in theater, and turning it on its head.” Through February 5, days and times vary, $16-$20. –Jacob Coakley

    • ONE NIGHT, THREE EXHIBITIONS, FIFTY YEARS AT BARRICK MUSEUM

      This week, the Marjorie Barrick Museum celebrates a half-century of existence as any other 50-year-old would—by reaffirming its sense of self and having a big to-do. The UNLV space soon to be known as the Barrick Museum of Art (its fourth name change, by our count) is opening three separate exhibitions in one night, plus a special bonus pick.

      The Matthew Gardocki-curated Process is a group show featuring John Bauer, Kara Joslyn, Christopher Russell and others who are actively modernizing Process Art, the discipline that produced such notables as Eva Hesse and Richard Serra. Masking, curated by Karen Roop, mixes traditional Mexican masks with contemporary works in an effort to “blur the lines between art and artifice.” Lee Cannarozzo presents Abandon All Hope, Ye Who Enter Here, a unique exhibition of rare Salvador Dali works contained within illustrated books; the pages of the books will be turned twice weekly through May 13, revealing fresh surprises every Tuesday and Friday. And Fifty Years documents the Barrick’s mission through newspaper clippings, historical photographs and various artifacts. If there’s one other thing 50-year-olds enjoy, it’s humblebrag. January 27, 5 p.m., free. –Geoff Carter

    • CELEBRATING THE YEAR OF THE ROOSTER ON THE STRIP

      Chinese New Year is one of the most festive annual holidays to take over Las Vegas Boulevard with free attractions and events. The Fashion Show’s runway will kick off the Year of the Rooster with a performance by the Sichuan Song and Dance Theater Company (January 27, 6-8 p.m.). The Grand Canal Shoppes at Venetian will host a fan dance above the waterfall (January 28, 3:45 and 4:30 p.m.). Wynn and Encore are displaying three nine-foot golden rooster statues, four 45-foot-long hanging dragons and more than 100 fruiting mandarin orange trees. And martial arts organization Yau Kung Moon will perform traditional Chinese dragon and lion dances at Aria (January 28 at 4 p.m.), MGM Grand (January 29 at 4 p.m.) and Bellagio (January 30 at 6:30 p.m.), which also hosts a full Lunar New Year display at its conservatory through March 4. –Brock Radke

    • WILLIE NELSON & FAMILY AT VENETIAN THEATRE

      The outlaw-country icon’s tour of Vegas venues continues (he’s also hit the Chelsea, House of Blues, Westin Resort, Golden Nugget, Smith Center and Sunset Station in the past five years) with five Venetian shows. (Note: The first two nights have been canceled due to illness. The February 1, 3 and 4 shows are still on.) January 28-February 4, 8 p.m., $55-$184. –Spencer Patterson

    • DAEDELUS AT BUNKHOUSE SALOON

      The LA underground hero and eclectic producer/DJ highlights the two-year anniversary of progressive dance collective The Rabbit Hole. Nine other billed performers mean this one’s going late. January 28, 9 p.m., $10. –Mike Prevatt

    • ‘SELLING WITH SIGNS' AT NE10

      Neon Museum’s resident scholar, architect/urbanist Martin Treu, speaks on “the placemaking power of commercial streetscapes”—specifically Vegas’ streets and the neon signs that came to define them. He’ll also sign his book. February 1, 7 p.m., 300 Las Vegas Boulevard North, free (register at neonmuseum.org). –Geoff Carter

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